Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published November 22, 2013

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

SLEEP DEPRESSION
Treating insomnia in depressed patients can double their chances of recovery

SMOG OVER YOUR HEART
Air pollution linked to cardiovascular disease

HIGH COURT WON’T MESS WITH TEXAS
Supreme Court decision lets stand Texas law requiring doctors who perform abortions to have hospital privileges

WHOLE FOOD, WHOLE STATE
Washington became the first state to adopt a comprehensive approach to increasing access to healthy food on state property and facilities

NOT JUST WOMEN UNHAPPY WITH CASUAL SEX?
Casual sex associated with worse mental health in both men and women

MATERNAL CHIN-UPS
Maternal exercise linked to cognitive benefits in newborns

MISCALCULATED RISK
American Heart Association’s heart risk calculator full of flaws, creates difficulty for cardiologists

DEADLY DELAYS
Delays for appointments and simple procedures have been blamed for veteran deaths

THE ACA IS A-OK
Three state governors explain how they got the ACA to work in their states

AGE OF CONSENT AND PUBLIC HEALTH
UK Public Health expert recommends lowering the age of consent in UK to lessen health risks to children having sex at a younger age

TIGER TITER
Princeton University to begin administering unapproved vaccine in the wake of meningitis outbreak

FRESH TAKE ON CANCER
Researchers find cancer patients prefer healthier food choices after beginning treatment

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.