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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published January 24, 2013

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.
TWICE THE POISON
A second chemical has been identified in the West Virginia chemical spill

OUT OF SHAPE
Researchers report changes in the shape of neurons in the brains of sedentary rats that ultimately effect blood pressure

DEADLY FLU
Three young adults die of the H1N1 strain of flu in Southeastern Michigan

CHANGING OF THE GUARD
Rural C.O.’s increasingly finding profit in selling e-cigs to prisoners

DIET FAIL
Diet soda drinkers guilty of caloric overcompensation through food consumption

I FEEL YOU, TOO MUCH
When oxytocin is given to adults that do not have social problems, they can become oversensitive to others’ emotions

BUT I USED TO BE AUTISTIC!
New autism criteria may result in fewer diagnoses, less access to health care services

OUT OF CONTROL
Aetna CEO says Americans have “unsustainable” view of healthcare costs

CRASH-TEST BABIES
Pivotal proposal sees that car seats withstand higher impact collisions for improved protection

WEED GROWING ON THE GRIDIRON
NFL Commissioner would consider use of medical marijuana for concussions

AN OBESITY WIN? NO WAY!
Better eating habits and not the economy helped stabilize obesity rates

ANTIDEPRESSANT WITHDRAWAL
People, especially women, having trouble stopping antidepressant use

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.