Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published February 28, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

SHIFTING SERVING SIZES
The FDA proposes changes to food and beverage nutrition labels to better reflect what people actually eat and drink

BRAIN DISEASE AND SOCCER
Degenerative brain disease CTE has been found in a named soccer player for the first time

COULD WE BE GETTING SMALLER?
New study shows 2-5 year old obesity rates are dropping

SNUS NOT SNUFFING SMOKING
Kids using snus before age 16 more likely to become smokers

E-CIGS DIVIDE PUBLIC HEALTH COMMUNITY
Some see the technology as a cure for addiction and others see it as a new one

BAD GAS
Report finds little is known of lasting health effects of fracking

RISKY BUSINESS
Teens who use tanning beds more prone to many other risky behaviors

WE’VE HEARD THAT BEFORE…
Centers for Medicare and Medicaid declares much anticipated International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10) revisions will be on time

OBESITY: WIN?
In a report by the CDC, obesity rates fell for young children over last 10 years

OBESITY: FAIL?
In same report, adult obesity rates stalled or increased over last 10 years

WHERE’S THAT THING BEEN?!
Study shows that doctor’s stethoscopes are more contaminated than the palms of their hands

OXYCONTIN REDUX?
Experts ask the FDA to think again on Zohydro

BEWARE THE CAMEL
Scientists say camels a major source of Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.