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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published March 7, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

THE $84,000 DRUG
The eye-popping price tag of a new hepatitis C drug is rattling patient advocacy groups and insurance companies

GOT WEED?
First medical marijuana ad airs on television

SECONDHAND CLOGGED ARTERIES
A new study finds that secondhand smoke causes lasting damage to children’s blood vessels

MOVIN’ ON UP HELPED GIRLS ONLY
In families who moved to neighborhoods with less poverty, girls fared better, while boys suffered greater depression and conduct disorders

HUMANS HOPE TO IMITATE AIDS PREVENTION IN MONKEYS
Although it will take years, successful AIDS prevention in monkeys is set to be tested in humans this year

I’LL HAVE WHAT SHE’S HAVING
Peers can influence our drinking behaviors, with or without our knowledge

OPEN SCHEDULE?
Is it time to end the ban on psychoactive drug research?

FRUITFUL INVESTMENT
New study finds that fruits and vegetables go further in low-income schools

BLACK CHILDREN GET THE ITCH
Food allergies gradually increasing, but doubling in black children

EPITWEETS
How big data from twitter can help monitor trends in HIV and drug-related behavior

SWEET SCIENCE
WHO recommends cutting sugar intake by half after reviewing the scientific evidence

PUBLIC BURN
Amidst backlash, L.A. bans e-cigarette use in many public spaces

THE HOOKAH UP
Increased hookah use poses health risk for today’s youth

WAIT, YES OR NO?
Young e-cig smokers more likely to start smoking real cigarettes, or are they?Conclusions from a recent study in a pediatric journal seem debatable

THE RISE OF MOSQUITOS
As global temperatures rise, mosquito-borne illnesses, like malaria, may target vulnerable populations in higher elevations

TWITTER HEALTH SURVEILLANCE
Study finds Twitter data can be used to monitor risky sex and drug behavior

SOMETIMES IT IS MENTAL
Mental health problems commonly mistaken for physical problems in children

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.