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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published March 21, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

A $1 SODA… OR MICROSCOPE
Stanford professor develops a microscope made from folded paper and able to diagnose bloodborne diseases like malaria

IT’S A CONSPIRACY
JAMA reports almost half of adults surveyed believe in medical conspiracy theories

YUMMY FOR YOUR TUMMY
The secret to dark chocolate’s health benefits lie in gut microbes converting cocoa into anti-inflammatory compounds

RECIPE OR THE CURE?
Prenatal exposure to methamphetamine may lead to cognitive deficits and ADHD-like symptoms in childhood

BEREAVE THIS
Some doctors may be too quick to prescribe antidepressants to bereaved parents

CHOOSING AGAINST INVINCIBILITY
Young women who opt for health insurance will benefit from many free services

A TALE OF TWO COUNTIES
The wealth gap and the longevity gap in the U.S.

ENDOW WOW
As government science funding is slashed, billionaires increase research funding by one percent

RARE HIV TRANSMISSION
First case of lesbian transmission of HIV reported in U.S.

FLU DRUGS SAVE LIVES
Adults who were treated with Tamiflu, Relenza or related drugs were half as likely to die in the hospital during the 2009 flu pandemic

GETTING MEASLES AT THE HOSPITAL
Some measles cases in the NYC outbreak may have resulted from exposure in medical facilities

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.