Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published April 4, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

EBOLA OUTBREAK IS HUGE! OR NOT?
As the Ebola virus outbreak continues in West Africa, MSF upset that WHO isn’t doing enough

CIVIL LIBERTARIANS UNCOMMITTED TO MENTAL HEALTH BILL
Provision that allows court-ordered outpatient therapy splits mental health groups on federal bill

STRAP IT ON!
A graphic depiction of the link between helmet usage and protection from death when riding a motorcycle

SURVEY SAYS TREAT, DON’T JAIL DRUG USERS
Majority of Americans think drug abusers should be treated, not incarcerated

RUNNING TO YOUR DEATH
Too much of a good thing may shorten your life span

DATA DELUGE
Medicare will publish billing data for 880K medical practitioners

DOCS GOING GREEN
Doctors show greater support for marijuana legalization than consumers

QUALIFICATIONS: AUTISM
How some companies are harnessing the unique skill sets of individuals with Autism

GETTING COVERED
Over 7 million people enrolled for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act

QUEEN BEE LITTLE
“Instrumental targeting” of popular students is common, confirming Mean Girls theory

THANKS JENNY MCCARTHY
NYC measles outbreak spreads to the Lower East Side

KINDLING
The role unvaccinated infants take in epidemics

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.