Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published April 11, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

REACHING THE NON-VACCINATORS
Public health officials are trying new techniques to reach non-vaccinators

HUNGER GAMES
Men with eating disorders often live in denial

NEWBIE INFLUX
Huge surge of newly insured patients puts strain on some health providers

KOCHS, OTHERS TOOK OBAMACARE DOLLARS
Some of ACA’s corporate critics took advantage of the law’s subsidies

LET ME RATE YOU!
Doctors implement patient rating system

BINGE DRINKING, THE GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING
Wounds inflicted while binge drinking take longer to heal due to reductions in macrophages

FLAPPY BIRDS? FLAP THIS!
Aggression from video games linked to incompetence rather than violent content

WE’RE IN THE MONEY
Global aid for health reaches a record high, with shifting patterns of international assistance

MIXED BAG FOR HEALTHY PEOPLE 2020
Public health goals for 2020 are showing no change—gains or losses—while some hope the ACA will spur on improvements

CLEAN CUT
Circumcision results in health benefits including reduced risk of STDs and prostate cancer

IN CONTAMINATED WATER
The inside story of the West Virginia chemical spill

BORN TO RUN?
Study suggests that desire to exercise is at least partly inherited

CASHING IN ON MEDICARE
A tiny fraction of health care providers who take Medicare receive over a quarter of its dollars

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.