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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published April 20, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

COMFORTABLY NUMB?
One in five pregnant women on Medicaid are prescribed opiates during pregnancy

SMOKE SHOW
Early lab data on e-cigarette vapors show potential safety concerns

SPEAKING UP
Shedding a taboo and learning to talk about suicide attempts

MUMPS EPIDEMIC
Outbreak spreads as cases of mumps nearly double in Ohio this month

TRADITIONAL GENDER ROLES ARE UNHEALTHY
“Feminine” teen girls are more likely to use tanning beds and be physically inactive, and “masculine” teen boys are likelier to chew tobacco and smoke cigars

PREYING ON THE YOUNG
Anti-smkoking advocates worry over direct tobacco marketing reaching huge numbers of teens

DO I LOOK FAT IN THIS MRI?
MRI successfully identified brown fat which could aid in research on obesity and diabetes

GUNS IN BLACK AND WHITE
Black men in the U.S. lose more years of life from firearm-related homicides than any other race or ethnicity

A POLIO IN THE EQUATOR
MRI successfully identified brown fat which could aid in research on obesity and diabetes

FINE PRINT
3-D printing may make printing prosthetic eyes, skulls and other body parts more efficient and affordable

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.