Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

HEMORRHAGE HAULT
Oxytocin injection administered by community health officers in Ghana shown to prevent postpartum hemorrhaging

NEW LEGION OF COMPOSTERS
Legionella bacteria found in UK composts

COLLATERAL CHILDREN
Accidental shootings of children, often by other children, result from the easy accessibility of guns in the United States

IT MUST WAIT
A new ban on texting while driving takes effect in Florida

SILENT SCREAMS FOR AUTISM
Was surgery to stop boy’s screaming the right decision?

SEXUAL DISCRETION
Obamacare does NOT require doctors to delve into patients’ sexual history

COCA-COLA GIVES BACK?
Company plans to erect 150 kiosks that offer water, electricity, Internet… and Coke products

ARTIFICIAL PANCREAS
Insulin pump automatically stops insulin delivery when blood levels are too low

RISKY BUT THEY KNOW IT
Swiss study shows that substance users are more informed than non-users

MOVE OVER, MEDICINE!
Research suggests exercise may rival the benefits of pills in fighting heart disease and more

BENCHED
Government shutdown sidelines CDC’s efforts to combat disease

SENIORITIS
The impact of global aging may be too much for some countries to handle

THE PROBLEM IS -COUGH-VACCINE REFUSERS
Personal belief exemptions behind California’s whooping cough epidemic

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.