Health beyond the headlines
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THE 2X2 PROJECT TAGS THE BEST AND WORST OF PUBLIC HEALTH IN THE NEWS

Published May 23, 2014

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

A MAJORITY OF US HAVE HPV
Nearly 70 percent of healthy American adults have HPV

LEAGUE OF PILLS
Lawsuit claims that NFL illegally supplied players with painkillers

GOV’T SHOULD BACK MARIJUANA RESEARCH
JAMA advocates federal funding for research into the efficacy of medical marijuana

OPERATION VACCINATION
Mixing intelligence and humanitarian efforts has led to a tremendous set back in vaccination efforts in Pakistan

QUITTING WITH E-CIGS
An English study finds that smokers were more likely to quit when using e-cigarettes as compared to nicotine patches or gum

YES LADIES, A LITTLE CHOCOLATE COULD KILL YOU
Diabetes is more dangerous for a women’s heart than men’s

ASK FOR CLEAN WATER? GET SENT TO SOLITARY CONFINEMENT
Following the West Virginia chemical spill that contaminated the water supply, inmates at one prison suffered dehydration and were punished for protesting

WAITLESS WEIGHT LOSS
Swedish men who consumed very few calories and exercised almost 9 hours per day for four days lost an impressive 11 lbs

JUST IN CASE
Most women who opt for a double mastectomy are not at high risk for a breast cancer recurrence

A DOLLAR FIFTY
Meta-analysis shows eating a healthy diet costs only $1.50 more per day than an unhealthy diet

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.