Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

MILK’S FAVORITE ADDICTION
Research team finds oreos to be as addictive as cocaine

JUGGLING CHAIN SAWS
CDC director Tom Frieden describes the impact of the shutdown on the CDC and Americans’ health

THE DSM DISTRACTION
The rapid increase in ADHD has more to do with perception and diagnosis than actual disorder

BREATHING IN CANCER
World Health Organization calls for efforts to reduce air pollution as a leading cause of cancer

MINDLESS BEHAVIOR
Ex-NFL players exhibit signs of diminished brain activity associated with decision-making and aggression control

CHINA’S HIV REGRESSION
Government proposal to deny entry of HIV patients to public bathhouses condemned by activists

CHOMP ON DIFF
Researchers investigate using bacteriophages to kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria like C. difficile

COSTLY SHOTS
Child gunshot traumas more costly than other childhood injuries

LOATIAN ANTI-CANCER CAMPAIGN
Laos implements nationwide GAVI- supported HPV vaccine campaign to reduce risks of cervical cancer

MOANING FOR HORMONES
Hormone use in menopause continues to show mix of risks and benefits

THE RACE TO EMERGENCIES
Black and Hispanic children presenting to emergency room with stomach pain are less likely to receive pain medication than white children

TRAUMATIC BUG INJURY
Researchers learn about TBIs from drosophila flies

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.