Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published October 25, 2013

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

PERILOUS POSTAGE STAMPS
Postage stamps displaying children playing without protective gear yanked due to safety concerns

SUPERBUG SPECIAL
PBS Frontline covers the rise in “nightmare” antibiotic resistant bacteria

MILKY ROAD
Breast milk purchased online could be contaminated

SPARE THE ROD?
Spanking linked to bad behavior later. Causation or correlation?

BOOSTIN’ ACTIVITY ON A BUDGET
Increasing physical activity in parks with low-cost marketing

PAGING DR. HERO
Syrian doctors facing risks of chemical attacks instrumental in gaining international intervention

CUT THE FAT
Study shows bariatric surgery trumps diet and exercise for weight loss, diabetes and metabolic syndrome

SWEET MEMORY (LOSS)
Study finds elevated blood sugar may be linked to memory problems

TEACHING AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS
Researchers find challenging mental activities may slow the rate at which the brain ages

FULL DISCLOSURE
NEJM provides a suggested framework for transparent sharing of clinical trial data

CLAMPING DOWN ON OPIOIDS
FDA recommends tighter controls for the most commonly prescribed painkillers

EXTEND IT!
Lengthening local health news stories may be beneficial to effective public health messages

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.