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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published November 1, 2013

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

DIY OR DIE?
Regular gardening or ‘do it yourself’ projects can cut the risk of heart attack in over-60 age group

SUICIDAL CANCER
Cancer diagnosis associated with heightened risk of suicide in young patients

THE GRINCH WHO STOLE HALLOWEEN
To combat childhood obesity, North Dakota woman says she will give children she deems “moderately obese” a letter instead of candy this Halloween

SURGICAL PRECISION
In terms of patient outcomes, the difference may be in the deftness of the surgeon

SMOKING DUALITY
In a study of twins with one smoker and one non-smoker, the smokers usually appeared older than their siblings

HALTING BIRD FLU
A new study in the Lancet finds that closing live poultry markets can cut new cases of H7N9 bird flu by 97 percent

A CASE OF THE MONDAY’S?
Thinking about kicking the (cigarette) butts? It must be Monday

ANY MALARIA TO DECLARE?
CDC reports highest incidence of malaria since 1971, almost entirely due to travelers

GAME CHANGER
NYC council votes to raise legal age to buy tobacco products from 18 to 21

SULLIED SEASONINGS
Twelve percent of all spices imported into the U.S. may be contaminated, FDA reports

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.