Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published November 8, 2013

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

JUNK IN DISGUISE
Can’t get people to stop eating junk food? Scientists say making junk food healthy, but great tasting vital to public health

IGNORANCE IS BLISS
Washington State voters rejected a ballot initiative that would have required foods containing genetically-engineered ingredients to be labelled

SPACE AGE
Accelerated aging from microgravity a potential public health problem of our space future

SWEET SURGERY
Type 2 diabetic patients show great improvements post-bariatric surgery

A REPORT CARD REPORT CARD
The Healthcare Association of New York State issued a report on independent groups grading hospitals, suggesting both U.S. News and World Report and Consumer Reports did poorly

CUTTING FAT
FDA ruling makes bold move to eliminate trans fats in food

MUSIC TO… MY BRAIN?
Early life musical instruction improves adult cognitive function

DELAYED REPAIRS, LOW ENROLLMENT
Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sibelius tells Congress that early enrollment numbers in healthcare.gov will be low

DIABETES AND DISABILITY
Global research team finds diabetes to be the second leading cause of disability worldwide

COMMUNITY GUIDANCE
Strategies to Overcome and Prevent (STOP) Obesity Alliance report offers community-based guidance to manage obesity

PEDIATRIC LUNG CANCER?
The doctor treating China’s youngest lung cancer patient is blaming the pollution in Jiangsu Province for her disease

ORGASMIC HEALTH
Huffington’s Post take on the unintended health benefits of orgasms

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The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.