Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

Published November 15, 2013

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

KNOW YOUR DOSE
Inhalers with dose counters lower emergency respiratory-related visits

THE SECOND STORM
Aid groups rush to avert public health crisis in Philippines

TO STATIN OR NOT STATIN
New guidelines generate confusion regarding cholesterol advice

FUMBLE IN THE WHITE HOUSE
Obama apologizes and vows to help those with canceled plans attain health insurance at last

PAID TO LIVE
Could the Swiss basic income proposal benefit public health?

FLEEING THE GRIDIRON
Youth participation in Pop Warner football has dropped nearly 10 percent between 2010-12

E-CIGS HELP SMOKERS QUIT
Study found that only 6% of e-cigarette users returned to smoking and of those who used both e-cigarettes and cigarettes, 46% quit smoking after one year

HARD ON THE KNEES
Obesity may be reason for rise in knee replacements

HEALTHCARE STALLED
In the first month of new state and federal health insurance marketplaces, just over 106,000 Americans signed up for health plans

DON’T ASK, DO TELL
Pediatricians who presume that parents will vaccinate their children have greater vaccination rates than those who ask parents if they plan to immunize

SAME BIRDS, DIFFERENT FLU
New strain of bird flu appears first in Taiwan

BREATHING SWEETLY
New needle-free technology for diabetics shows encouraging results

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.