Health beyond the headlines
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Phresh!

The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

GREY EXPECTATION$
Life expectancy of older women in rich countries increases

CHILLING EFFECT
Cold weather shown to produce more heart attacks

eSMOKING IN HOMEROOM
In just one year, the percentage of middle and high school students who have tried e-cigarettes has doubled

TWO LIVES TO LIVE
Why do we live nearly twice as long as our ancestors?

CHEAT THRILLS
Study finds a “cheater’s high”, as long as nobody gets hurt

MISSING MED
Kids who don’t take prescribed medication more likely to end up in ER

WHOOPIN’ THROUGH TEXAS
Pertussis outbreak in Texas on pace to hit 50-year high

CHICKENING OUT
Responsibility for poultry inspections may pass from Agriculture Department inspectors to poultry plant employees

GAME CHANGER
Video games help improve cognitive function in older populations

JONZING FOR BANDWIDTH
Bradford Regional Medical Center is the first hospital to admit patients for internet addiction

SLEEP SCALES
Study links sleep deprivation with increased food purchases the next day

One Response to “Phresh!”

  1. September 06, 2013 at 3:54 pm, Patches Magarro said:

    I was shocked to hear that there is no minimum age for ecigs. I wonder if a vendor would actually sell one to say, a 9 year old? A five year old?

    Reply

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