Health beyond the headlines
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The 2x2 Project Tags the Best and Worst of Public Health in the News

The 2×2 Project seeks to translate emerging public health science through compelling and timely communication in order to elevate the conversation. Thus, an inherent part of our mission is to keep current on when and how public health science is featured in the news. Some is headline-worthy, some represents the successes and shortcomings of public health. And some just makes you go, “Hmm….” Our Communicating Health and Epidemiology Fellows (CHEFs) will tag the best and worst of public health in the news every Friday. We’re covering health beyond the headlines. The writing is on the wall.

DON’T FORGET THE DIRT!
Disease may be linked to excessive hygiene

MIND OVER CANCER?
PLOS takes issue with recent review suggesting psychotherapy extends cancer patient lives

USE IT (RIGHT) OR LOSE IT
FDA seeks to strengthen warnings on widely used pain medicines

INFECTION$
Healthcare associated infections cost an estimated $9.8 billion

LIFE IS CHEAP
A CDC anti-smoking campaign helps 100,000 Americans permanently kick the habit, costing less than $200 for each year of life saved

10 MILLION STRONG AND GROWING
A new study finds that 1 out of every 20 American kids is severely obese

CAMELS BUMPING MERS CASES?
European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control calls for more research to determine if camels could be the source of the infections in Saudi Arabia

PAINFUL STATS
Study estimates that 83% of the world’s population has inadequate access to pain medications

BUZZ OFF!
Natural compounds could make humans “invisible” to mosquitoes

BMI CAN BE SUCH A HEADACHE
Study finds that those with high body mass index are 81 percent more likely to suffer from headaches

GOOD THINGS, SMALL PACKAGES
New study finds smaller testicle size associated with better parenting

RISKY BUSINESS
Adult film industry faces concerns over wave of recent HIV cases

Elevate the conversation

 
The views and opinions expressed on this website are solely those of the authors and do not represent those of the Department of Epidemiology, the Mailman School of Public Health, or Columbia University.